Category Archives: Food

New Year’s Day 2015 treat (organic and delicious)

We had wanted to have something special for New Year’s Day 2015 (1/1/2015). Here is a photo of our lovely, midday snack…

Organic tea, organic raspberries, and holiday chocolate.
Organic tea, organic raspberries, and holiday chocolate.

Details of our yummy, holiday snack:

Kimberly drank Numi  Tea Organic Rooibos; Ian drank Zhena’s Gypsy Tea Organic, Fair Trade Chocolate Chai

They shared Driscoll’s organic raspberries from the regular grocery store and chocolate which was a delicious gift from a family member.

What will be our 2016 treat?

20 ways to be an empowered citizen, empowered consumer

I was sitting in a class on how to build support for making social change, and one of the discussions we had is a comparison of the differences between the civil rights era environment and today’s civic environment.  This made my mind leap into making a list of a score of dozen ways to be an empowered citizen and an empowered consumer.

Writing this post, I realized that this list is a micro version of Gandhi’s Constructive Program. In the period between civil Disobedience Campaigns, Gandhi kept his followers engaged and progressing by building a sustainable community-based economy to replace the imperial system which oppressed them.

Making organic mashed potatoes with Kimberly #...
Making organic mashed potatoes.
  1. Buy local, organic, and fair trade.
  2. Move your money to a credit union.
  3. Drink more water, but not bottled.
  4. Have a car-less day.
  5. Throw out your TV.
  6. Grow a garden.
  7. Share hand-me-downs.
  8. Use your library.
  9. Support local arts.
  10. Make your own music.
  11. Support local and independent media.
  12. Only donate to nonprofits where you know how the money is being used.
  13. Only support candidates and political parties who don’t take corporate donations.
  14. Teach people how to write-in on the ballot when they don’t like the choice of candidates.
  15. Cook family meals at home.
  16. Oppose war.
  17. Oppose insurance companies and support single payer health insurance
  18. Spend less
  19. Barter
  20. Join a CSA {Community Supported Agriculture].

TWL: Vinegar

TWL: Things We LoveI admit that I do like the fancy Balsamic Vinegar that come in wine bottle shapes and make awesome dressings and marinades.  This post is not about that vinegar.

This post is about the white vinegar that you can find in the clear plastic gallon jug in the bottom shelf of the supermarket.  Even better is the extra-cheap store or generic brand.  We usually have at least two jugs of it around the house at a time.

No, we don’t use that much by putting it on our breakfast cereal every morning.

We clean with vinegar.  All the time.  Continue reading TWL: Vinegar

TWL: Things We Love

I know it's not Valentine yet but I'm full of ... Happy Valentine’s Day!

The idea of this site is to help bring a little more love into the world. We have been working to create a community space to share the way to a more peaceful life. Our definition of a peaceful life encompasses all areas of our lives.

Since the early days of this site we have been focusing on what it means to be a pacifist, and we will continue to do so.  We have also touched on what a shareable economy means; peaceful music and books; how a CSA works; and why vintage jewelry is better than new.

TWL will focus us on exploring what more of what peace means in the  rest of our lives, such as what it means to freecycle; to be a vegetarian; a locavore; a community member; to use nonviolent communication; and to clean with vinegar.  And more.   But first,

We want to hear from you!

What brings peace into your life?

What can you share from your journey?

Please use the comments section to share.

Continue reading TWL: Things We Love

Jen Chapin on Occupy, Parenting, Food, and Creativity

Jen Chapin album Reckoning
Jen Chapin album Reckoning

OnTheWilderSide had a free-flowing  chat with Jen Chapin about her new album, Reckoning.   We covered topics ranging from Occupy to parenthood.

We started our discussion with Chapin by asking her about the balance between the intimate and the political on the new album, Reckoning. The album includes songs on both ends of the spectrum, such as Insatiable about never-ending war and “Don’t Talk” which praises making love as a needed form of marital communication.

Chapin described the intimate and the political as “a balance I am always trying to strike.”  She saw it as something stretching back through her life:

Read the rest of the article on the original website.

Review: “Share or Die!”, Millennials’ Response to Scarcity

The world view envisioned in the anthology of essays, Share or Die!, Voices of the Get Lost Generation in the Age of Crisis, is one in which human interaction is re-shaped by Generation Y (the Millennials).  This new kind of interaction is to be based upon sharing, using a mixture of high-tech and high-touch.  Serendipitously, about the same time as our review copy of the book appeared in the mail, an example of what the book was hoping to achieve also arrived in the mail.

Read the rest of the review at onthewilderside.com  Continue reading Review: “Share or Die!”, Millennials’ Response to Scarcity

Opening a CSA Greenhouse: Biophilia

Biophilia CSA: Greenhouse in March2013
Biophilia CSA Greenhouse

We recently posted on our sister site about going to a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) Fair to join a farm. That post can be found at CSA’s on Long Island: Photos from a NOFA event.   We joined a local CSA named Biophilia.

By joining a CSA, you pay for a share which entitles you to a portion of the vegetables harvested during a season.  Many CSA’s, including the one we joined, are organic.  It is a way to support local farmers directly and get fresh produce.

Many CSA’s take the “community” part very seriously by having events throughout the growing season for the members to participate.  At Biophilia, we helped out at the opening of the greenhouse  by planting seed flats.

The farmer had mentioned that the name Biophilia was taken from a book by Edward O. Wilson, but Susannna had noticed that the farm’s name had the farmer’s name in the middle of it.  Coincidence?

We got to choose what vegetable we wanted to plant. Farmer Phil made the mistake of asking my favorite food. Continue reading Opening a CSA Greenhouse: Biophilia